OUTAD Self-Powered Emergency Radio Review

OUTAD Self-Powered Emergency Radio Review

To say that man-made and natural disasters such as power outages, floods, fires, tsunamis, and tornadoes are stressful times is an understatement. Just witnessing these seemingly apocalyptic events on the television is enough to send our minds reeling and disoriented.

Imagine being trapped in your home with no news, electricity, or access to the outside world. How do you survive?

Unfortunately, we are bound to encounter them at one point in our lives, especially with climate change and all. From a simple power outage to a devastating hurricane, an emergency situation is something that we can take a pounding or two from if we could arm ourselves with the right tools.

While there’s only so much we can do to protect ourselves from these situations, having an evacuation bag may go a long way to up our chances of survival or at least make the event less stressful than it already is.

One indispensable tool that should be in every camping or evacuation bag is an emergency radio that provides a warning before disaster strikes. Today, we’ll check out OUTAD Self-Powered Emergency Radio and see how it holds up in such situations.

Features

The OUTAD Self-Powered Emergency Radio features:

  • a signal range of 87MHz to 108 MHz on FM
  • a 3” x 2.4” x 1.8” measurement
  • a net weight of 10.5 ounces
  • straightforward and quick access controls for volume and radio frequency scanning
  • a blue and black, yellow and black, or red and black design option
  • a three-way charging system: hand-crank dynamo, solar cells, and USB cable
  • 5 W power consumption
  • a bright LED flashlight of 200 lux that can last 8 to 10 hours
  • a 2000mAh power bank for mobile phone charging
  • a micro Secure Digital Memory card slot for MP3

And, it comes with a USB cable and manual.

Pros 

  • The emergency radio can access NOAA Weather, FM, and AM stations without a hitch. It also sounds clear and considerably loud for its size.
  • It is multi-purpose. It has useful emergency features such as a decent light and a high power-charging capability.
  • There are many ways to charge it. Most especially, it has a hand crank dynamo which comes handy during power outages or when you’ve run out of electricity and solar power.

Cons                                  

  • The hand-crank could be a lot more ergonomic. At 5.3” x 2.4” x 1.8”, hand-cranking may prove to be uncomfortable for those with bigger hands.
  • One minute of cranking can provide enough energy for the radio to play for about 5 minutes. Other hand-crank weather radios though can generate more power from one minute of hand cranking.

Summary

DESIGN:

The OUTAD Self-Powered Emergency Radio comes in three bright colors of red, blue, or yellow with black. Thus, it is quite easy to spot.

This compact and multi-purpose device can be comfortably held in one hand, with the button for the light conveniently positioned where the thumb rests. While the size is good news for some, it can be a challenge for those with bigger hands though.

RADIO RECEPTION:

Tuning in to the weather station is no sweat for this device. It provides a good range of frequencies for AM, FM, and NOAA stations. Plus, the sound quality and volume are decent for its price and size.

HAND CRANKING:

As for the power that the device’s hand cranking mechanism produces, it is a bit wanting. With Kozo and ELECLOVER dynamo weather radios, one-minute of cranking can provide 18-minute and 20-minute power for radio play, respectively; whereas with this particular OUTAD radio, the same effort will only generate 5-minute of power for radio play.

It is great though that aside from the dynamo, OUTAD can be powered through sun exposure or via USB cable. Nevertheless, those features are common with most emergency radios these days.

Some even have the extra battery power option like Kozo’s emergency weather radio.

ADD-ON FEATURES:

The add-on features for OUTAD’s emergency radio is very basic yet decent, if not powerful. It has a flashlight of 200 lux as well as a power bank of 2000 mAh.

RunningSnail’ version, which shares the same design as OUTAD’s, only has a 1W light and a 1000 mAh power bank. iRonsnow’s weather radio though has a brighter light at 5,000 lux, but it runs quite low in power bank storage of 300 mAh.

Some welcome features for OUTAD’s emergency radio, based on other makes and models within its price range, would be an audio jack for private listening, an SOS red light alarm, and a siren. Undoubtedly, these will make great additions to an emergency radio.

If extra features are the least of your concerns and you’d rather get a dedicated public alert radio, Midland WR120/WR120EZ is worth looking into. It receives flood, thunderstorm, tornado, and other warnings from 7 NOAA channels. Plus, it boasts of a voice alert, 90dB siren, and an LED warning system.

This one though is not equipped with a hand crank generator. In the event of a power outage, running on batteries is its only option.

PRICE:

OUTAD hand crank emergency radio falls in the low-end category yet it offers good value for its price. It works well as an emergency radio and offers decent illumination and mobile phone charging capabilities on the side. 

Verdict

Overall, OUTAD hand crank emergency radio makes a good addition to any emergency evacuation bag. For its price, just getting a radio that can tune in to AM, FM, and WB bands without a hitch is already a good return.

Its add-on features are by no means just afterthoughts either. The light shines brightly at 200 lux, and the power bank has more than enough power to recharge drained phones at 2000mAh.

While a 5-minute radio play power from a minute of cranking is admittedly lousy compared to others, this emergency radio is respectful enough to justify that by its price.

There are other emergency radios at the same price point that can offer more features and greater juice from one-minute of cranking. Nevertheless, OUTAD hand crank emergency radio has its own merits.

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